BEWARE the post-COVID return to ACTIVEWEAR … Returning to sport following a COVID lockdown

The COVID-19 pandemic has created huge repercussions across the world and changed our way of life drastically. No one alive today has experienced anything like the restrictions we have experienced and there are many unknowns of how such long periods of shutdowns will affect both our physical and mental health. NSW in particular will be coming out of a 4-month hard lockdown with restrictions on gyms and outdoor recreation to lift and eventually the return of competitive sport (possibly next year). There is light at the end of the tunnel! But as sport physiotherapists, we cannot help but wonder how this will affect injury rates.

So you’ve been told you have abdominal muscle separation, now what?

What is Abdominal muscle separation?

Abdominal muscle separation is a common term used to describe rectus abdominis diastasis (RAD). RAD is a common condition that occurs during pregnancy. The right and left rectus abdominis muscles, also known as the ‘6 pack muscles,’ are connected by a fascial tissue called the linea alba. The linea alba softens and stretches during pregnancy to allow for growth of the baby. The stretching of the linea alba is what constitutes RAD. Health professionals will measure the distance between your right and left rectus abdominis muscles to assess the amount of the separation.

5 Tips to help you set up your Workstation Ergonomically

Ergonomics is a buzz word used frequently in the covid-19 era, but what does it mean? Ergonomics is creating and arranging workplaces and systems so that they best fit you. In 2013, Safe Work Australia estimated workplace injury and illness to be an economic cost of 60 billion dollars annually (Safe Work Australia, 2013). It has been a long year of working from home.

You are stiff and in pain and your makeshift work station needs a change because the work must be done.